Pete's Pet Posse

It’s not unusual to find OSU’s pet therapy animals surrounded by students at the Student Union or trotting across campus, happy to stop and let people pet them.

Since 2013, Pete’s Pet Posse has been a part of Oklahoma State University’s culture.

Pete’s Pet Posse, OSU’s Pet Therapy Program, was established as a wellness program in Fall 2013. Through a cooperative effort of the President’s Office, OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, OSU Veterinary Medical Hospital, University Counseling, Human Resources, and the Employee Assistance Program, the program has experienced much success. Pete’s Pet Posse’s works to positively enhance physical and emotional health, and contribute to the success of being America’s HEALTHIEST® Campus.

Elsa-Pet-Therapy

Elsa, the OSU Foundation’s Pet Therapy dog

These animals belong to faculty, staff, and others affiliated with OSU and are not owned by the university. These animals live with their humans full time and make campus a brighter orange each time their furry feet hit the campus. The OSU Foundation even participates; Elsa can regularly be found at the front desk at our Monroe location.

Evie, one of the first dogs in the program, was abandoned by her family in and survived the 2013 Shawnee tornado that ravaged the area.

Read more about Evie’s story here.


P3T: OSU-Tulsa and OSU-CHS’ Pet Therapy Program

Pete’s Pet Posse, OSU’s Pet Therapy Program, was established as a wellness program in 2013 and expanded to include Pete’s Pet Posse Tulsa at OSU-Tulsa and OSU Center for Health Sciences in 2015.


These animals belong to families of employees and others affiliated with OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa. They are not owned by the university. They live with their humans full time and make the campus a little brighter orange each time their furry feet hit the campus.

“As a physician, I know animals play a positive role in people’s health. There is something about animals that make people happier and healthier. We always thought they did, but there is actually scientific research to support that idea.”Kayse Shrum, D.O., president of Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences and the dean of the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine.


Areas of Impact

When you make a gift to the Pet Therapy program at OSU, you are helping improve the health and well-being of both humans and animals!

  1. OSU Pet Therapy Program Fund 20-81600
  2. OSU in Tulsa Pet Therapy Program Fund 32-22900
Ann Hargis

Ann Hargis

“We have developed robust programs in physical activity and nutrition. Now we are focusing on emotional health. Pete’s Pet Posse is designed to positively impact the entire campus population.” Ann Hargis, OSU’s First Cowgirl


To make a donation to Pete’s Pet Posse, which will help offset maintenance and training costs as well as other expenses, contact Mandy Heaps.